SMSC

How we grow the spiritual, moral , social and cultural lives of our children at Freegrounds Junior School

At Freegrounds Junior School we aim to provide a comprehensive academic, spiritual, moral, social, cultural and physical education for all children. Through our curriculum – including taught lessons, the provision of experiences, a range of enrichment activities and extra-curricular opportunities – our thoughtful and wide-ranging promotion of spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and physical well-being enables our children to thrive in a supportive, highly cohesive learning community. Below we have provided a snapshot of the breadth and range of these opportunities.

Spiritual

Explore beliefs and experience; respect faiths, feelings and values; enjoy learning about oneself, others and the surrounding world; use imagination and creativity; reflect.

The spiritual development of pupils is shown by their:

1. Ability to be reflective about their own beliefs, religious or otherwise, that inform their perspective on life and their interest in and respect for different people’s faiths, feelings and values.

Actions:

  • R.E. lessons where tolerance and understanding of religions such as Buddhism and Judaism as well as Christianity are taught and opportunities to reflect are woven into the lessons.
  • Wide range of texts which help to develop an understanding and appreciation of a wide range of cultural influences used to lead topics, during class story time or as texts studied during guided reading. As well as a large range being available in the school library.
  • Assemblies that focus of different beliefs, feelings and values. An example of this include harvest festival where children were encouraged to think about being hungry and how our harvest would be used to help those less fortunate.
  • Activities in projects which encourage pupils to consider and reflect on the feelings of others such as when children are evacuated, how the Celts would have felt when the Romans invaded and what it was like to be a slave.

Evidence:

evidenceImpact:

  • Our children can reflect on their own beliefs.
  • Pupils can talk about as well as demonstrate interest, respect and tolerance for other people’s faiths, feelings and values.
  • Our children ask questions about other people’s faiths, feelings and values.
  • Our pupils read a wide range of texts which help them to develop an understanding of different beliefs and values.

2. Sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them

Actions:

  • Delivery of the SEAL programme of study, throughout the school, titled- Good to be me.
  • Creative curriculum projects which look at how others live and the world around them such as; Don Quixote(Spain) in Year 3, Our World in Year 4, Brazil in Year 5 and It Rocks in Year 6.
  • The beginning of every topic has a ‘Stunning Starter’ activity, day or trip to excite pupils about their learning.
  • ‘Fabulous Finish’ events at the end of every project to enable children to be proud of their learning and share what they have done with others year groups, parents or pupils at the infants.
  • Enrichment activities to provide rich learning opportunities for all learners, including Able, Pupil Premium and SEN groups. E.g. More able writing workshops, theme days, visitors to school such as Mexicolor.
  • ELSA support for those children who need further support to learn about themselves.

Evidence:

evidence2

 

Impact:

  • Our teachers actively encourage our children to ask questions about others and the world around them.
  • Our teachers create learning journeys that help our children to see beyond the homogenous demographic in which they live.
  • Enjoyment and fascination is truly evident in lessons where pupils are working on projects about others and the world around them.
  • Our pupils are proud to be themselves and share their personalities and skills happily with their peers.
  • Real enjoyment and fascination in the wider world is evident in lessons.
  • Pupils are proud of the work they do about themselves, others and the world around them and are happy to share this with peers, staff and parents during assemblies and ‘Fabulous Finish’ events.
  • Pupils who receive ELSA support are much happier than before and are equipped with skills to help them understand and manage themselves.

3. Use of imagination and creativity in their learning

Actions:

  • Our integrated and creative curriculum delivers projects that truly interest pupils and promote imagination and creativity such as Invaders in Year 3, Significant People in Year 4, Space in Year 5 and Sporting Heroes in Year 6.
  • Academic Review Day activities enable pupils to be imaginative and creative. Examples include Designing a dragon to go in the books ‘How to Train your Dragon’ and designing a ‘Where’s Wally’ Scene and then writing a postcard from Wally whilst visiting the scene.
  • Project plans include opportunities for pupils to personalise their learning. Examples include: Year 3 pupils can select the decade they wish their puppet to depict; during dance children choreograph their own routines and Year 5 pupils get to design their very own planet during their Space project.

Evidence:

evidence3

Impact:

  • Our children can use imagination and creativity to help them when solving mathematical problems, designing in D&T lessons, creating art, composing music, choreographing gym or dance routines and even to help them write engaging pieces of writing.
  • Teachers are planning for deep learning where children are required to be more creative and apply their knowledge and understanding to different and less structured activities.
  • Teachers are planning more opportunities for pupils to be able to personalise their learning.
  • Open ended project homework allows for pupils to research and present information how they wish.
  • Our pupils value creative ideas shared by their peers.

4. Willingness to reflect on their experiences

Actions:

  • Academic Review Days enable pupil and teacher time to meet to discuss and reflect on the achievement of their targets.
  • Pupils traffic light the achievement of their Learning Objectives for all lessons.
  • At the end of each project pupils complete a ‘Reflective Review’ which will be shared with parents at the end of the year.  Reflection opportunities planned for the end of every RE unit.
  • One of the school’s Learning to Learn skills taught for half a term is- ‘Reflective’. Pupils are taught in lesson how to and are encouraged to reflect.
  • Planned opportunities for pupils to reflect on their achievements after designing and creating products in design and food technology lessons.

Evidence:

evidence4

Impact:

  • Our pupils meaningfully reflect on their learning and progress so that they receive the support they require from their class teachers.
  • Teachers plan for meaningful reflections at the end of lessons which are often structured so pupils know how to meaningfully reflect.
  • Our pupils respond and act on ‘next step’ marking.
  • Our teachers carefully think about how they will teach the Learning to Learn skill- Reflective in all subjects.

Moral

Recognise right and wrong; respect the law; understand consequences; investigate moral and ethical issues; offer reasoned views.

The moral development of pupils is shown by their:

1. Ability to recognise the difference between right and wrong, readily apply this understanding in their own lives and, in so doing, respect the civil and criminal law of England.

Actions:

  • School rules, which promote the right way to behave, are displayed around the school and in all classrooms.
  • When children have done something wrong they are encouraged to talk about what the right thing to have done was.
  • Delivery of the SEAL programme of study for PSHE lessons ensures pupils are exposed to drama and scenario activities about right and wrong.
  • Learning the rules for team games during PE lessons.
  • Stories with moral dilemmas are used in guided reading sessions as well as for class story.

Evidence:

evidence5

Impact:

  • Our children can talk honestly about what they have done wrong and what they could have done in order for them to have made the right decision.
  • Our children recognise the difference between right and wrong and apply this understanding to their own lives.
  • Our staff explain why they are trying to teach our pupils right from wrong so that they can understand and apply this understanding to their own lives and therefore demonstrate respect for the civil and criminal law of England.
  • Our pupils follow the rules and etiquettes of team games they have been taught like, football, rounders and netball.

2. Understanding of the consequences of their behaviour and actions

Actions:

  • School rules, which promote the right way to behave, are displayed around the school and in all classrooms.
  • Pupils understand the school behaviour policy and know what the consequences of their behaviour and actions will result in.
  • Use of routines, such as Sharing Assembly, and a system of rewards and sanctions to promote the School Rules and hard work.
  • Learning to Learn certificates are awarded to pupils who demonstrate the focus Learning to Learn skills: Relationships, Risk Taking, Reflective, Resourceful and Resilient.
  • Learning to Learn display in each classroom to help promote responsibility, independence and behaviours for learning.
  • Use of a home/school agreement signed by parents and children to promote shared responsibility for the moral development of children.

Evidence:

evidence6

  • Our children know and understand the consequences of their behaviour and actions and therefore behaviour is very good and bad behaviour is rare.
  • Our pupils are encouraged by the reward system and are proud to be selected by their class teacher to share good work in Sharing Assembly or receive and Learning to Learn certificate.
  • Our teachers ensure the behaviour policy is followed so that all pupils know and understand the consequences of their behaviour and actions.
  • When the behaviour policy has to be enforced, pupils understand and accept the consequences and can often explain to staff what they believe the consequence of their behaviour should be.

3. Interest in investigating and offering reasoned views about moral and ethical issues, and being able to understand and appreciate the viewpoints of others on these issues.

Actions:

  • Assemblies about moral and ethical issues E.g. sustainability and reading resources across the world.
  • Guided reading texts cover moral and ethical issues. E.g. Whale boy, George’s Marvellous Medicine and Why the Whales Came.
  • Pupils write balanced arguments and newspaper reports in Literacy and Topic lessons so that they analyse moral and ethical issues from different points of view.
  • Curriculum projects which tackle moral and ethical issues like, slavery, deforestation and migration.  Eco-Team who meet regularly and promote recycling and sustainability.

Evidence:

evidence7

Impact:

  • Our pupils demonstrate a genuine interest in real moral and ethical issues.
  • Our children can offer viewpoints about issues and often support them with clear reasons or evidence.
  • During guided reading sessions, our pupils ask insightful questions about the moral and ethical issues raised by their texts.
  • Our children listen to and respect the viewpoint of others when discussing moral and ethical issues.

Social

Investigate and moral issues; appreciate diverse viewpoints; participate, volunteer and cooperate; resolve conflict; engage with the ‘British values’ of democracy, the rule of law, liberty, respect and tolerance

The social development of pupils is shown by their:

1. Use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with pupils from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds

Actions:

  • Use of a range of robust programmes of additional support for children with social and emotional learning needs.
  • One of the school’s Learning to Learn values taught for half a term is- ‘Relationships’. Pupils are taught in lesson how to and are encouraged to build positive relationships.
  • Planned opportunities for children to develop their skills and ability to share information and communicate effectively to different audiences including, debates, presentations, assemblies and news reports.
  • Opportunities to work in groups, pairs or individually to solve problems in a range of contexts.

Evidence:

evidence8

Impact:

  • Our pupils cooperate effectively with each other regardless of their religion, ethnic or socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Our pupils use a range of social skills to enable them to work with and communicate effectively with children throughout the school.
  • Our staff ensure all pupils work with different peers in the class and year group so that they develop the social skills required to enable them to work well with others from different religious, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.

2. Willingness to participate in a variety of communities and social settings, including by volunteering, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively

Actions:

  • Promotion of a range of fundraising activities, such as the Rotary Club Shoebox Appeal and Red Nose Day.
  • Work with members of the community and other agencies or companies during theme days.
  • School Jobs rota so that each class has a role to play in the running of the school. Activities include, collecting the recycling, weeding the allotments and feeding the birds.
  • Establishment of a range of extra-curricular clubs with social aspects, including choir, netball and nature club.
  • Promoting initiatives such as, recycling, sustainability and reading via steering groups.

Evidence:

evidence9

Impact:

  • Our pupils, with some guidance, can quickly resolve conflict when they arise.
  • Our pupils demonstrate skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in a variety of communities and social settings.
  • Our pupils are able to collaborate with other on projects within the community, working and socialising with pupils from different religious, ethic and socio-economic backgrounds.

3. Acceptance and engagement with the fundamental British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs; the pupils develop and demonstrate skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain.

Actions:

  • Democratic votes for key positions in school including, house captains, school councillors and eco-reps.
  • Dedicated time for our School Council to make a difference to systems and processes at the school.
  • Provision of curriculum activities that promote social responsibilities including, fair trade, deforestation, sustainability.
  • Swimming tuition for all Year Five pupils.
  • Bikeability training for all Year Five Pupils.
  • Year 6 residential.
  • Fire Van visit to Year Six.
  • Computing sessions which focus on the ethical ad safe use of the internet and E-safety.

Evidence:

evidence10

Impact:

  • Our pupils are prepared with the skills and attitudes they require in order to contribute positively to society in Britain.
  • Our pupils understand how voting works in order for appointments to positions of influence can be made democratically.
  • Pupils demonstrate acceptance and understanding of fundamental British Values of democracy, the rule of law and individual liberty by following the school rules and participating in elections.

Cultural

Appreciate cultural influences; appreciate the role of Britain’s parliamentary system; participate in culture opportunities; understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity.

The Cultural development of pupils is shown by their:

1. Understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences that have shaped their own heritage and that of others

Actions:

  • Implementation of projects that looks at different cultures and how they shape their own heritage. Examples include: Romans, Greeks, Spain and Brazil.
  • Topic projects led by texts from different cultures such as, Don Quixote a Spanish story and books like The Thing and The Arrival written by an Australian Author- Shaun Tan.
  • Year Three study a project called ‘Britain Since the 1930s’ in which children look at how fashion and music have changed through the decades as well as consider what might have caused those changes.
  • Sponsor Diane, a child living in Rwanda.
  • Study significant people that have influenced our culture like Shakespeare, Jamie Oliver and Enid Blyton.
  • Pupils learn Spanish and during those lessons they also learn about Spanish culture and traditions.

Evidence:

evidence11

Impact:

  • Our pupils understand and appreciate how events and significant people from the past have influenced their own heritage as well as that of other people.
  • Our pupils demonstrate respect and appreciation for a range of different cultures with their school and further afield.
  • Our pupils demonstrate genuine interest in different cultures and can make links to their own lives.

2. Understanding and appreciation of the range of different cultures within school and further afield as an essential element of their preparation for life in modern Britain

Actions:

  • Curriculum projects that give opportunities for pupils to examine cultural differences in food or dance through projects like Don Quixote and Brazil.
  • A range of duel language books in the library.
  • Parents are invited in to share their knowledge and experiences of living or working in different countries.
  • Assemblies to different cultures.

Evidence:

evidence12

Impact:

  • Our pupils demonstrate respect and appreciation for a range of different cultures with their school and further afield.
  • Our pupils demonstrate genuine interest in different cultures and can make links to their own lives.
  • There are very few racist incidents within school.

3. Knowledge of Britain’s Democratic parliamentary system and its central role in shaping our history and values, and in continuing to develop Britain

Actions:

  • Hold school elections which mirror the British parliamentary system.
  • Assemblies about local and general elections as well as the history of democracy.
  • Mock election in class during the general election.
  • During Year Five’s Ancient Civilizations project, pupils learn about the history of democracy.
  • Elections are held at the start of the year where pupils run for positions within the school such as; school council, House Captain and Eco Rep.

Evidence:

evidence13

Impact:

  • Pupils have a growing knowledge of Britain’s Democratic parliamentary system.
  • Pupils have an understanding of some of the history behind Britain’s Democratic parliamentary system.
  • Pupils have an emerging understanding of the role the democratic system has had on shaping our history.

4. Willingness to participate in and respond positively to artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities

Actions:

  • Creative writing is celebrated in the school newsletter.
  • High-quality work produced by children is celebrated during weekly ‘Sharing’ assemblies.
  • The curriculum gives pupils opportunities to produce art work inspired by different cultures.
  • End of Year school production where children can participate in a variety of artistic ways such as, drama, dance and singing.
  • Promote reading and creative writing through a variety of visits from authors and illustrators as well as reading competitions such as ‘Reading to Succeed’.
  • Offer a range of cultural enrichment opportunities like, origami and karate.
  • Offer musical enrichment opportunities like, instrument lessons and choir.
  • Offer sporting enrichment activities like Bikeability, netball and dance.
  • Our curriculum has many artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities.
  • A variety of Inter-house competitions take place throughout the year where pupils represent their house in sports competitions.

Evidence:

evidence14

Impact:

  • Our pupils are very positive about artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities and willingly participate in optional activities as well as those that are part of the school day.
  • Our after school clubs are always oversubscribed due to our pupil’s willingness and enthusiasm to participate in the varied extra-curricular opportunities that are offered to them.
  • Over a quarter of the school takes part in the school production in which their creativity and enthusiasm really shines.
  • Pupils truly engage with the authors that visit and as a result they purchase many of their books. Also, the demand for these books form the library goes up.

5. Interest in exploring, improving understanding of and showing respect for different faiths and cultural diversity, and the extent to which they understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity, as shown by their tolerance and attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

Actions:

  • Pupils are taught about different religions during RE lessons.
  • Assemblies cover cultural diversity and different faiths.
  • Respect and Relationships are two of our five ‘Learning to Learn’ values. Learning and teaching about these values permeates the school curriculum.
  • Library books about different faiths and cultures.
  • Through the curriculum pupils learn about different faiths which are followed today and those from the past such as Greek Gods.

Evidence:

evidence15

Impact:

  • Children demonstrate genuine interest and respect when learning about different faiths and cultures.
  • They listen well to others about their beliefs.
  • Pupils enjoy learning about the diversity of the world we live in via discussions in class and assemblies.
  • Pupils clearly demonstrate the ‘Learning to Learn’ values of Respect and Relationships and are rewarded when demonstrating these through certificates and personal statements that are added to their ‘Learning to Learn’ tree in their class. Teachers give these out and Lunchtime Supervisors nominate pupils to receive certificates.

Promoting Fundamental British Values at Freegrounds Junior School

Fundamental British Values in the Curriculum